Posts Tagged ‘box office’

Reviewing Silence resulted in bumping this segment back a few days, but today we’re dealing with that constantly nagging voice that whines that there’s nothing original left in Hollywood.

Its not the movie studios’ fault if folks choose to ignore good films they are not familiar with. Known commodities will nearly always win box office battles, because its easier to get people in the seats, but profit and box office receipts don’t equate to quality, and in this age there’s honestly no excuse for not seeing the amazing new films and ideas out there.

You’ll note that a star * = still in theaters, and +/- signs indicate how much more or less money the film made to its counterpart on this list last year.

Where Did They Come From?

There are four categories: Originals, Adaptations, Sequels (which include prequels and spin-offs), and Remakes.

To be fair, I’m only listing films that made it to wide release. If I counted limited release films as well, the original films would trounce the other categories in a landslide.

Originals

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Using the same qualifiers that the Academy Awards use, Original Films are films that are new screenplays, and not based on previously existing material such as novels, plays, television shows, etc. Basically, “Original” means not connected to any pre-existing work in print, screen, or stage.

Films based on events, but not creative works, are still original films. In 2015 there were 61 original films released. This past year (2016), there were 68.

The Top Five Original Films at the worldwide box office in 2016 were:

  1. Zootopia – $1.02B+$144M {Inside Out}
  2. The Secret Life of Pets $875.5M/ +$401.7M {San Andreas}
  3. Moana$555.2M/ +$311.4M {The Good Dinosaur}
  4. Sing – $488.2M/ +$250.5M {Spy}
  5. Passengers $292.9M/ +83.9M {Tomorrowland}

 

Adaptations

doctor-strange

Adaptations are all films based on already existing material, which can include novels (The Legend of Tarzan), comic books (Dr. Strange), plays (Fences), TV shows, etc.

Reboots are classified as adaptations because they are not sequels to existing material, but new versions of adapted material.

The emergence of shared universes is making classifying some films tricky. My guide is that if the focus of the film is on a character or characters that have not headlined a film before (Suicide Squad and Dr. Strange for example), then it is an adaptation.

In 2015 there were 38 adaptations, this year that number is 44.

The Top Five Adaptations at the worldwide box office in 2016 were:

  1. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them$810.6M/ +$214.3M {The Martian}
  2. Deadpool$783.1M/ +$147.2M {Mockingjay, Part 2}
  3. Suicide Squad$745.6M/ +$202.9M {Cinderella}
  4. Doctor Strange$670.2M/ +$150.9 {Ant-Man}
  5. Warcraft$433.7M/ +19.3M {Kingsmen: The Secret Service}

 

Sequels/Prequels

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In this category are films that are sequels or prequels to other films. There were 30 sequels in 2016, that’s an increase of seven from the previous year.

The Top Five Sequels/Prequels in 2016 were:

  1. Captain America: Civil War$1.15B/ -$547M {Jurassic World}
  2. Rogue One$1.04B/ -$499.9M {Furious 7}
  3. Finding Dory$1.03B/ -$470.1M {Star Wars: The Force Awakens}
  4. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice$873.3M/ -$526.7M {Avengers: Age of Ultron}
  5. X-Men: Apocalypse$543.9M/ -$656.1M {Minions}

 

Remakes

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This category includes all remakes of feature films regardless of their country of origin. There were only 4 remakes in 2016, up one in number from the year before. Here are their international totals.

  1. The Jungle Book$966.6M/ +$871.1M {Poltergeist}
  2. Ghostbusters$229.1M/ +$148.9M {Point Break}
  3. The Magnificent Seven$162.4M/ +$152.4 {The Loft}
  4. Pete’s Dragon – $143.7M

 

In Conclusion

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Though the sequels brought in the most money in 2016, it was less than the previous year, with most of that shortfall moving to original films (especially the animated variety) and The Jungle Book.

Once again, the myth of Hollywood losing its creativity is debunked.

The Blockbuster Report

It looks to be a pretty tame outing for new films this weekend. I had high hopes for Now You See Me, a new magician/bank robbing caper saga, but it looks to be middle of the road. After Earth, starring Will and Jaden Smith, is telling a story we’ve basically seen already this year, and it is far less effective, even though Oblivion  was far from perfect. As has become routine with M. Night Shyamalan films these days, skip it.

There are a few interesting if unspectacular limited release films out this weekend. ThKings of Summer is a pretty standard coming of age story with runaways and adventure. The East, a spy thriller starring Alexander Skarsgard and Ellen Page, looks decent, and Shadow Dancer, which could be the best of the three, is a drama involving a woman forced by MI5 to spy on her own family over their ties with the IRA (the Irish one, not the American one).

Now-You-See-Me-Official-Movie-Trailer

My Film to See this weekend remains Now You See Me. I like the cast and I’m a sucker for magician stories, even though this isn’t anywhere near The Prestige on my favorite films list. Plus it sure as heck is better than After Earth.

Where Do They Come From?

We have After Earth as an original film, as it was written by Shyamalan and Gary Whitta after getting the story idea from Will Smith. Now You See Me is also an original.

Original: 20

Adaptation: 16

Sequel/Prequel: 8

Remake: 2

Re-release: 2

Oscarwatch (Not including this weekend’s films)

1) Mud

2) Before Midnight

3) Frances Ha

4) Upstream Color

5) What Maisie Knew

6) Star Trek Into Darkness

7) The Place Beyond the Pines

8) 42

9) Iron Man 3

10) Side Effects

New additions: Before Midnight (#2)

Departures: The Croods