2017 in Cinema – Where Did They Come From?

Posted: January 27, 2018 in Uncategorized

Year after year, the claim is circulated that Hollywood is losing its creativity and running out of original projects. And year after year, this fun little segment proves that claim wrong.

“Where Did They Come From?” breaks down every wide-released movie into one of four categories: Originals, Adaptations, Sequels (which include prequels and spin-offs), and Remakes. How these terms are defined is listed in the appropriate segment below. In sorting films into these categories, we can see how original Hollywood is (or isn’t).

Only wide-released films count towards these numbers, because the vast majority of limited release films are original films and counting them would heavily skew the numbers.

A star (*) indicates a film still in theaters, and +/- signs indicate how much more or less money the film made to its counterpart on this list last year.

 

Originals

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Using the same qualifiers that the Academy Awards use, Original Films are films that are new screenplays, and not based on previously existing material such as novels, plays, television shows, etc.

Films based on events, but not creative works, are still original films. In 2017 there were 60 original films released. In 2016, there were 61.

The Top Five Original Films at the worldwide box office in 2017 were:

  1. Coco – $657M/ $543M {Zootopia}
  2. Dunkirk – $525.2M/ -$350.3M {The Secret Life of Pets}
  3. The Great Wall – $334.9M/ -$220.3M {Moana}
  4. Get Out – $254.7M-$193.5M {Sing}
  5. The Greatest Showman* – $233.4M-59.4M {Passengers}

 

Adaptations

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Adaptations are all films based on already existing material, which can include novels, comic books, TV shows, etc.

Reboots are classified as adaptations because they are not sequels to existing material, but new versions of adapted material.

The emergence of shared universes is making classifying some films tricky. My guide is that if the focus of the film is on a character or characters that have not headlined a film before (Suicide Squad and Dr. Strange for example), then it is an adaptation, even though the characters in question may have starred in a different film.

In 2016 there were 44 adaptations, this year that number is 46.

The Top Five Adaptations at the worldwide box office in 2017 were:

  1. Spider-Man: Homecoming – $880.2M+$69.6M {Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them}
  2. Wonder Woman – $821.8M+$38.7M {Deadpool}
  3. It – $700.3M-$45.3M {Suicide Squad}
  4. Justice League – $655.3M-$14.9M {Doctor Strange}
  5. The Boss Baby – $498.9M+$65.2M {Warcraft}

 

Sequels/Prequels

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In this category are films that are sequels or prequels to other films. There were 30 sequels in 2017, the exact same number as the previous year.

The Top Five Sequels/Prequels in 2017 were:

  1. Star Wars: The Last Jedi* – $1.3B+$150M {Captain America: Civil War}
  2. The Fate of the Furious – $1.23B-$190M {Rogue One}
  3. Despicable Me 3 – $1.03B+$6.2M {Finding Dory}
  4. Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 – $863.7M-$9.6M {Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice}
  5. Thor: Ragnarok* – $851.7M/ +$307.8M {X-Men: Apocalypse}

 

Remakes

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This category includes all remakes of feature films regardless of their country of origin. There were only 5 remakes in 2017, up one in number from the year before. Here are their international totals.

  1. Beauty and the Beast – $1.26B+$293.4M {The Jungle Book}
  2. Kong: Skull Island – $566.7M+$337.6M {Ghostbusters}
  3. The Mummy – $409.2M+$246.8 {The Magnificent Seven}
  4. Going in Style – $84.9M/ -$58.8 {Pete’s Dragon}
  5. Sleepless$32.8M

 

In Conclusion

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Once again, the myth of Hollywood losing its creativity is debunked.

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